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nahum [2017/06/30 21:29]
reneepatton [Historical Setting]
nahum [2017/07/01 12:56] (current)
lydiagaston
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 ====== NAHUM ====== ====== NAHUM ======
  
-The book of Nahum is God's vision of the impending judgment against the city of Nineveh. The prophet Jonah had gone to Nineveh to proclaim ​its destruction, ​yet at that time it was spared. However, after a hundred years [Precept Ministries] had passed, God declares through the prophet Nahum that judgment was to come. It has been said that when God's vision came to Nahum, Nineveh was at the pinnacle of wealth and power as the capital of Assyria, "​secure behind her impregnable walls. Or so she thought."​ [Precept Ministries]+The book of Nahum is God's vision of the impending judgment against the city of Nineveh. The prophet Jonah had gone to Nineveh to proclaim ​a warning of destruction, ​and at that time the city was spared. However, after a hundred years [Precept Ministries] had passed, God declares through the prophet Nahum that judgment was to come. It has been said that when God's vision came to Nahum, Nineveh was at the pinnacle of wealth and power as the capital of Assyria, "​secure behind her impregnable walls. Or so she thought."​ [Precept Ministries]
  
  
 ====== Author ====== ====== Author ======
  
-The prophet Nahum, the Elkoshite (1:1), was the author of this book. The name Nahum, or Nachuwm in Hebrew, means "​comfort"​. Although there is little recorded in the text of scripture to inform ​one of who Nahum was, it is possible that he was a prophet of Judah (cf. 1:15) [Norman Geisler]. The book of Nahum informs ​us that he was an Elkoshite. While there is no scriptural cross references for this people group or possible city of Elkosh, it is interesting to note that according to Wikipedia, there is a modern-day village of Elkosh in northern Israel. The village was established in 1949 by immigrants from Yemen. It is proposed that the village, "was named after the biblical city of Elkosh, birth-town of prophet Nahum (Nahum 1:1), which was located in the area." The red text on the map below shows the location of this village. ​+The prophet Nahum, the Elkoshite (1:1), was the author of this book. The name Nahum, or Nachuwm in Hebrew, means "​comfort"​. Although there is little recorded in the text of scripture to inform ​us of who Nahum was, it is possible that he was a prophet of Judah (cf. 1:15) [Norman Geisler]. The book of Nahum provides ​us the knowledge ​that he was an Elkoshite. While there is no scriptural cross references for this people group or possible city of Elkosh, it is interesting to note that according to Wikipedia, there is a modern-day village of Elkosh in northern Israel. The village was established in 1949 by immigrants from Yemen. It is proposed that the village, "was named after the biblical city of Elkosh, birth-town of prophet Nahum (Nahum 1:1), which was located in the area." The red text on the map below shows the location of this modern-day ​village. ​
  
 {{:​elkosh-pos.png?​nolink&​200 |}} {{:​elkosh-pos.png?​nolink&​200 |}}
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 {{ :​nahum_s_tomb.jpg?​nolink&​300|}} The Old Testament commentary of Keil and Delitzsch records that,  {{ :​nahum_s_tomb.jpg?​nolink&​300|}} The Old Testament commentary of Keil and Delitzsch records that, 
-//"​Elkosh is not to be sought for in Assyria, however, viz. in the Christian village of Alkush, which is siuated on the eastern side of the Tigris, ​tot he north-west of Khorsabad, two days' journey from Mosul, where the tomb of the prophey ​Nahum is shown in the form of a simple plaster box of modern style, and which is held in great reverence, as a holy place, by the Christians and Mohammedans of that neighbourhood (see Layard, //Nineveh and its Remains//, i.33), as Michaelis, Eichhorn, Ewald, and others suppose."// ​+//"​Elkosh is not to be sought for in Assyria, however, viz. in the Christian village of Alkush, which is siuated on the eastern side of the Tigris, ​to the north-west of Khorsabad, two days' journey from Mosul, where the tomb of the prophet ​Nahum is shown in the form of a simple plaster box of modern style, and which is held in great reverence, as a holy place, by the Christians and Mohammedans of that neighbourhood (see Layard, //Nineveh and its Remains//, i.33), as Michaelis, Eichhorn, Ewald, and others suppose."// ​
  
  
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  //"​In order to assure that conquered territories would remain pacified, the Assyrians would force many of the native inhabitants to relocate to other parts of their empire. They almost always chose the upper and more powerful classes, for they had no reason to fear the general mass of a population. They would then send Assyrians to relocate in the conquered territory. When they conquered Israel, they forced the ten tribes to scatter throughout their empire."// ​  {{ :​diodorus-siculus_0.jpg?​nolink&​200|}}  //"​In order to assure that conquered territories would remain pacified, the Assyrians would force many of the native inhabitants to relocate to other parts of their empire. They almost always chose the upper and more powerful classes, for they had no reason to fear the general mass of a population. They would then send Assyrians to relocate in the conquered territory. When they conquered Israel, they forced the ten tribes to scatter throughout their empire."// ​  {{ :​diodorus-siculus_0.jpg?​nolink&​200|}}
  
-The historical background of Nineveh includes the account from Genesis 10:8-12 which records that Nimrod went forth into Assyria and built Nineveh as Theologian Hampton Keathly points out in his article on the book of Nahum. He further states that the city of Nineveh was destroyed by the Babylonians,​ Medes and Scynthians in 612 B.C. The ancient historian Diodorus Siculus* (picture to the right) recorded that the armies laid siege to Nineveh for two years, until the Khosr River, which ran through the city, flooded and broke down part of the city wall providing a breech for the enemy. Keathly states, //"​This fulfilled part of Nahum'​s prophesy in 1:8; 2:6 and 3:​13."//  ​This book is regarded as a sequel to Jonah. ​ It would appear that the Assyrians, after their repentance at he preaching of Jonah, soon relapsed into gross idolatry. ​ They plundered other nations, and their capital became like a lions' den full of prey, chapter 3:1.+The historical background of Nineveh includes the account from Genesis 10:8-12 which records that Nimrod went forth into Assyria and built Nineveh as Theologian Hampton Keathly points out in his article on the book of Nahum. He further states that the city of Nineveh was destroyed by the Babylonians,​ Medes and Scynthians in 612 B.C. The ancient historian Diodorus Siculus* (picture to the right) recorded that the armies laid siege to Nineveh for two years, until the Khosr River, which ran through the city, flooded and broke down part of the city wall providing a breech for the enemy. Keathly states, //"​This fulfilled part of Nahum'​s prophesy in 1:8; 2:6 and 3:​13."//  ​
  
 ====== Outline ====== ====== Outline ======
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 ====== Purpose ====== ====== Purpose ======
  
-It could be offered that one of the purposes of the book of Nahum is to remind God's people across the centuries after its authorshipof the mercy and grace of God. The first chapter of Nahum deals much with the character of God. And although many of the verses found therein display the power and purity of his justice, the book as a whole can be seen as a drop of mercy. God gives Nahum a vision for the destruction to come to Nineveh, however He is not simply bringing punishment to Nineveh without cause. For in Nahum 1:7 the reader is reminded that, //"The LORD is good, a stronghold in the day of trouble, and He knows those who take refuge in Him."//​ God had already given warning to Nineveh through Jonah to turn from their ways and be spared. Against the wishes of the prophet Jonah who wanted God's wrath to come upon them, God told Jonah, //"​Should I not have compassion on Nineveh, the great city in which there are more that 120,000 persons..."//​ (Jonah 4:11). God spared Nineveh and extended compassion to them in Jonah'​s day. +It could be offered that one of the purposes of the book of Nahum is to remind God's people across the centuries after its authorship of the mercy and grace of God. The first chapter of Nahum deals much with the character of God. And although many of the verses found therein display the power and purity of his justice, the book as a whole can be seen as a drop of mercy. God gives Nahum a vision for the destruction to come to Nineveh, however He is not simply bringing punishment to Nineveh without cause. For in Nahum 1:7 the reader is reminded that, //"The LORD is good, a stronghold in the day of trouble, and He knows those who take refuge in Him."//​ God had already given warning to Nineveh through Jonah to turn from their ways and be spared. Against the wishes of the prophet Jonah who wanted God's wrath to come upon them, God told Jonah, //"​Should I not have compassion on Nineveh, the great city in which there are more that 120,000 persons..."//​ (Jonah 4:11). God spared Nineveh and extended compassion to them in Jonah'​s day. 
  
 Also, it is important to remember that by bringing destruction on Nineveh this time, He was also acting as a protector for Israel. In Nahum 2:2 one reads, //"For the LORD will restore the splendor of Jacob like the splendor of Israel, even though devastators have devastated them and destroyed their vine branches."// ​ Also, it is important to remember that by bringing destruction on Nineveh this time, He was also acting as a protector for Israel. In Nahum 2:2 one reads, //"For the LORD will restore the splendor of Jacob like the splendor of Israel, even though devastators have devastated them and destroyed their vine branches."// ​
 +
 The book of Nahum displays the way God's justice and mercy are bound together in His perfect character.  ​ The book of Nahum displays the way God's justice and mercy are bound together in His perfect character.  ​
  
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 ====== Further Study ====== ====== Further Study ======
  
 +  * What information does historical research provide us in description of the wall around Nineveh?
 +  * How can Jesus be seen in the book of Nahum?
   * What connections are there between the book of Nahum and that of Isaiah? [Greg Herrick]   * What connections are there between the book of Nahum and that of Isaiah? [Greg Herrick]
-  *  
  
 +  ​
 ====== Resources ====== ====== Resources ======
  
nahum.txt ยท Last modified: 2017/07/01 12:56 by lydiagaston